Tag Archives: Fan Fiction

The Complexities of Writing a Series – Snowball Effect

Hi everyone!

While the Sword of Dragons is not the first series I have ever written, it is by far the biggest, and I’m only a few books into it!  And the further I go, the more I’m beginning to realize the daunting task ahead of me.

Image Source - https://www.pinterest.com/pin/442197257133712811/
Image Source – https://www.pinterest.com/pin/442197257133712811/

Whether or not anyone else has used it before, I call it the snowball effect.  With each and every new story, there’s more material built up, and therefore more material I have to be intimately familiar with to ensure continuity.  (Because I hate continuity errors…as much as I love Star Trek, it was pretty bad about that in later series.)

Now with three books (2 published, plus the Orc War Campaigns which is as big as a novel), working on book 3 has required me to go back often and reference notes, thoughts, and actual pages from previous stories to ensure I’m getting all of the characters, locations, and plots straight.

Image Source - https://magisterscorner.wordpress.com/tag/mass-effect/
Image Source – https://magisterscorner.wordpress.com/tag/mass-effect/

I’m beginning to understand why the creators of the Mass Effect series did not want to take the story beyond the 3rd game.  For me it’s just one continual story I have to keep track.  For Mass Effect, in each game, the player gets to make a multitude of decisions that affect not only the outcome of the current game, but the games to follow.  Keeping track of and including all possibilities into each game must have been crazy difficult!!  And as far as I could tell from playing the trilogy, they did a great job!

I’m curious to see what they do with the new game, Andromeda…how much of player decisions can show through into Andromeda?  Or can players even load in their Mass Effect 3 play through to affect it?  We’ll find out soon enough :)

Star Trek Dragon – My First Series

stdragonThe first time I wrote a continual story was my fan fiction, Star Trek Dragon.  Spread across 7 season, 66 episodes of which were a part of the main seasonal run, and 4 more that weren’t part of the episode numbering, it was a pretty big story.  I never brought them all together to get a word count, but I can imagine it’s pretty massive.

There were many instances, especially in season’s 6 and 7, where I took things I had written in the earlier seasons and made them vital to where the story and characters went.  It was fun!

Started while I was at the tail end of Jr. High and finished in College, it wasn’t the most popular fan fiction out there, but it was well received by those who did read it, and I did have a small fan following near the end.

The Sword of Dragons – So Much More Complicated

Cover by Christian Michael
Cover by Christian Michael

So knowing that I successfully wrote 7 seasons and only created a couple of plot holes and inconsistencies, why does The Sword of Dragons feel so much more difficult?

When thinking about this question this morning, the answer seemed rather obvious: in Star Trek Dragon, I had copious amounts of references to look back on, plus I knew the Star Trek universe better than any other.  It was pre-established. And fans are really good at documenting what has happened in it.

With the Sword of Dragons, it’s an entirely made up Universe, one which I’ve built from the ground up and continue to build.  There’s no fan wiki out there (if only I had the time to build one…)  And unfortunately, I don’t have a team of editors helping me with continuity.  It’s just little ‘ol me taking on an entire Universe…

I also wonder how much of the difficulty writing book 3 is stemming from my flare-up of ADHD, because it seems like it’s been harder than it should be.  In any case, I’ll continue to work my hardest to keep it all straight, and will depend on my awesome beta readers (Nick, Natalie, you both rock!) to help keep me on the straight and narrow :)

Final Thought – The Star Wars EU

Image Source - http://www.vg247.com/2014/05/02/we/
Image Source – http://www.vg247.com/2014/05/02/we/

I was just about to finish this blog when I realized something: I think I understand now why Disney decided to split apart the Star Wars Expanded Universe and the Cinematic Universe.  There are literally hundreds of Star Wars EU novels out there: keeping track of everything and getting the continuity right, all while trying to come up with an original story for the new movies, is beyond daunting…

Thanks for reading!
-Jon Wasik

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Writing What We Know – From The Heart

Hi everyone!

Thank you so much to everyone who has viewed and supported my first foray into vlogs earlier this week!  It was simultaneously a terrifying and fantastic experience, and based on what I’ve read and been told in person, I think I’ll do more in the near future :)  (If you haven’t seen it yet, click here to check it out!)

In that first vlog, I admitted to something that made me blush on-screen: much of what the characters feel and experience on an interpersonal level came from my own personal experiences…more so than any other story I have ever written.

Doctor Who?
Doctor Who?

Last night, when I was at a friend’s Halloween party, I was talking with some of my friends there and telling them about this, and some of the comments they made started to make me think further about this…

This emotional connection is what draws people in to many stories.  I read an article not long ago about this very thing, too, and I believe I recall the word used was pathos: when you frame anything into a narrative where the people and their experiences are the focus, it causes a reader or viewer to feel empathy for the characters, and feel more drawn to them and their story.

How important is this, you say?  Here’s an example of a story without that element:

A great evil’s power resides within a ring, which is taken cross-country to a volcano where it is cast into the fires and destroyed.

lotr-mordorSound familiar?  It should…I’m pretty sure anyone reading this is likely to know the story of The Lord of the Rings.  Except…if the way I told it just now was all that the story consisted of, it’d be kind of boring.  Tolkein’s writing style aside, that would not have been a memorable story.

frodo-and-sam-mount-doomBut when your story includes a single Hobbit who thinks he can’t make a difference, but still rises up to save the entire world, through pain and hardship and loss, overcoming the most difficult obstacles ever, along with a fiercely loyal friend who never gives up on him…that is a story that connects to the readers.  Not to mention all of the other characters’ stories: Aragorn’s struggle to rebuild the great kingdom, Legolas and Gimli’s friendship, Merry and Pip’s adventures and friendship, and Gandalf’s rise to become the White Wizard.

Image Source – http://www.bleedingcool.com/2016/06/28/new-writing-from-j-k-rowling-about-the-north-american-school-of-magic/

I’m getting a bit off topic here…but then I wonder, how much of the emotions evoked in Lord of the Rings came from Tolkein’s own experiences in life?  We know from her interviews that JK Rowling’s own life experiences and emotions were poured into the Harry Potter novels, and they are one of the most wildly popular books out there, for both children and adults!

So I wonder…is this the secret to writing stories that people will love and connect with?  Stories that they will obsess over and write fan fiction about and make fan art for?

Image Source - https://www.pinterest.com/pin/200128777168277635/
Image Source – https://www.pinterest.com/pin/200128777168277635/

It looks like I’m going to find out in the coming years…because as hard as it was to write some of the scenes in The Orc War Campaigns, especially the final episode…I want to keep doing this.  I want to infuse my life, my experiences and emotions, into the stories.  It helped me connect with my characters better, and it is my hope that it will help you, my dear readers, connect with them as well…

Thank you for reading, and for all of your support over the past few years!  <3!

-Jon Wasik

Of Sacrifices and Dedication – Committed to Writing

Hey everyone!

While I am super anxious to share more info about Burning Skies with you all, I wanted to touch on a subject that, as someone who is committed to becoming a full-time writer, has become very prevalent in my life lately.  And that is specifically the sacrifices I’ve been making the last few years, and how all of the people in my life have reacted to it.  In a way, this post is part of the core of my blog’s purpose: the trials and triumphs of writing.

More than 20 years ago, I started writing, and it has since become my great passion!  I’ve written for so long, I simply can’t remember or imagine my life without it.  And I don’t want to imagine a life without it.  I had grand dreams of becoming a known author, someone who inspired thousands, even millions with my stories.

Someday.  Tomorrow.  Eventually.

The dreams I had were always “Someday.”  Whenever something came up to distract me from writing, writing became “Tomorrow.”  And getting published?  “Eventually.”

stdragon20 years as a writer, and I had nothing published, outside of Star Trek Dragon’s run on the internet.  20 years without making a dime off of writing (which, if you ever want to write full time, is important.)  “Eventually” turned into 20 years.

Not long after I moved to Denver, which was a major turning point in my life, I decided to stop letting that happen.  I was going to get published!  If not with The Sword of Dragons, than with some other novel!  Those of you who have read my blog from the beginning have seen the majority of that struggle.

Photo taken by Laura Earley
Photo taken by Laura Earley

It started with proving to myself that I could write full time, or as close to it as I could.  So when the idea of Chronicles of the Sentinels was born, I decided to work on it, every.  Single.  Day.  And I did.  2 or 3 hours every night after work.  5 or 6 hours every Saturday and Sunday.

In 3 months time, I completed pre-production, writing, and the first series of proofreads and edits on book 1, Legacy.  It was, and still is, an exciting story, and if never picked up by an agent, will one day be self published.

I had done it!  I had proven to myself that I was a true-to-heart writer.

And when I almost-had-but-lost an agent for Chronicles, that was when I decided to self-publish.  I could have started with Chronicles, but I wanted to work on my first love: The Sword of Dragons (Hmm, there’s an idea for a blog: each novel, each series, as a love affair ;)  lol)

I had some idea how much work was ahead of me, but I still had no idea just how much work it would take to promote the book and get it out there.

Between writing, editing, and working on my social media presence (such as with the blog you are enjoying right now,) I’ve been doing something writing related almost every day.

Balancing Writing with Life

Something else extraordinary has been happening since I moved to Denver.  Any one who knew me before I moved here knows that I was once a very shy guy, who would sooner sit at home and play video games that interact with, well, anyone.

20160312_105213Since I’ve moved to Colorado, I’ve slowly emerged from my shell, and have finally built a base of some truly incredible friends, both at work and outside.  I’ve gone to conventions, parties, and seen and done things I never, ever thought I would.  And I love spending time with my friends, and seeing my family that lives in the area!

But I also work 2 jobs now.  At least, that is how I treat my writing – as a 2nd, part-time job.  I take it that seriously, and as I build up my platform and start to gain readership, I feel ever-more obligated to keeping up with writing (which is good, in my mind, it keeps me focused :) )

Anyone who has worked more than one job knows that your social life suffers to some extent.  I don’t want to lose the friendships I’ve built up, and I genuinely want to spend time with friends and family, but in recent months, I’ve found myself learning to say something very important to anyone who truly desires to make it as a writer, an artist, a singer, ANY passion or artistic endeavor.

Learning to Say No

Before I continue, I know that many of my friends read this blog, and I want to say here and now: no, this post is not a gripe or an attack.  In fact, you have no idea how wonderful it makes me feel when you insist I come have drinks with you, or go to a movie, or hang out, I love it!  And I love each and every one of you :)

To my fellow aspiring writers, artists, heck to everyone out there with goals and ambitions: the word “no” is something you should learn to be comfortable saying.

In fact I’m suddenly remembering a conversation that my friend Wayne and I had a long while ago.  He told me how he often overbooks and spreads himself too thin because he just hasn’t learned to say no when people ask something of him, whether favors or just to hang out.

And when he told me that, and suggested I learned to say no, I took that to heart.  With some hesitance, I have started to exercise that powerful word.  I hope so very much that my friends understand.  I hope that they realize I have fallen so far behind my schedule as a writer, and that I need to make sacrifices to get back on track.

So while the word “yes” is equally as powerful, so is “no”, and if you can learn to balance the two, it will become a truly wondrous superpower!

Too dramatic to call it a superpower?  I don’t think so.  Because believe me, it is not easy.  To all of my friends, I thank you for your patience and understanding, and your continued support of my addiction, uh, I mean passion ;)

And as always, to all of my readers, thank you so much for reading.  Something I often write when I sign books, I now say to everyone out there:

Never give up on your dreams!

Thanks for reading :)
-Jon Wasik

Would You Rather – Short Stories vs. Novels

Hey everyone!

As I’ve started to focus again on finishing Burning Skies and have set The Orc War Campaigns aside for the moment, it’s brought up the question that I’ve asked myself on more than one occasion: which do I prefer writing?  Short stories or novels?

star-trek-tos-movie-novels1When I first started writing, I was all about novels.  My dream was to write Star Trek novels, but when I discovered I had to be well-known to be asked to write Trek, I started focusing on my own stories.  And I started the first novel of what was then called Star Dragon Legion.

I know I’ve mentioned it on my blog before, but that first novel was lost to a computer virus before I knew well enough to backup my files.  Instead of starting the novel over, I decided I wanted to flesh out the characters more, and I knew I needed practice.

stdragonIn 1999, my first series of short stories began, with the fan fiction Star Trek Dragon.  Simultaneously, I began writing occasional short stories set in the Star Dragon Legion universe.  The goal was to focus on improving my writing and getting near-immediate feedback on experiments in my writing style.

I know I’ve given this history before, so I won’t bore you all with a retelling ;)  But I honestly don’t remember a whole lot about my experiences writing those first couple novels.  And additional attempts at writing novels back then fell flat on their face.  I hadn’t found a method that worked for me…yet.

Complexity and Expanse

With each passing season of Star Trek Dragon, I started to turn it more towards a serial story.  I even began planning out each season in a method very similar to what I now do for planning out novels (click here to read more about that :) )

I found that I liked that format more, a long-arching story with multiple chapters, multiple story threads all converging into one at the end.  Not to mention that, without even planning to, stories I wrote throughout the entire series all came together in the final season, and everything became connected.

And that’s just it, with novels I can spend more time on characters, flesh them out more, spend time expanding on the plot threads, and interweaving them all.  A single novel can be much more complex than a single short story.

But then…in a way, isn’t a novel just a bunch of short stories interconnected?  Chapters in a novel, episodes in a series of short stories…

So then the question remains, which do I prefer?

Going Back to Short Stories

digital-cover-1As I’ve written The Orc War Campaigns, which has been my return to the short story realm, I find that I am on the fence about which I prefer.  I didn’t spend nearly as much time developing TOWC as I do on novels, and that may be skewing my experience with it.

But at the same time, especially once I stopped including Cardin and the characters from the novels in it, I was able to really start fleshing out Amaya, Zerek, and Arkad more.  And that has been fun.  Imagine if I could spend time writing 20 or so episodes, we could really get to know the characters!

Release Schedule is the Killer

As a self-published author, in reality I only need to publish stories as often as I choose.  I don’t have a publisher giving me deadlines.  Never-the-less, I do have fans that want stories, and I do not want to disappoint them.  Not to mention people will lose interest if I don’t publish stories regularly.

So even as an independently published author, I have deadlines.  And writing The Orc War Campaigns has been fun, but the release schedule was exhausting.

And this is where I find I prefer writing novels.  For the remainder of The Sword of Dragons, I’m essentially giving myself a one year release schedule – every year, I release a new novel.  One year to focus on a single story.  Granted a longer, more complex story, but that time spent on one story I think shines through.

(On that note, I do intend to put The Orc War Campaigns through the same rigorous post-writing process once all of the stories are written.  The final product, to be published as an anthology, will probably be much more refined than the free, online versions :) )

So there you have it, my friends.  I love writing, and reading, novels more than short stories.  I enjoy both, but that is my preference.  What about all of you?  Which do you prefer?  Why?

Thanks for reading!
-Jon Wasik

When Is A Short Story Too Long?

Hi everyone!

digital-cover-1I’ve been writing the 4th episode of The Orc War Campaigns and, as it reached 41 pages earlier this week, a question has arisen: when does it become too long to be considered a short story?

What is the definition of a short story? Being a nerd, I of course looked it up as soon as I thought of the question today.  Which, by the way, is not to say I don’t have experience with short stories – at this point in my life, I’ve written well over 100 of them.

But based on the various definitions I’ve seen, including different dictionaries defining it slightly different, wikipedia, and countless other sources…there’s no one consensus.  In fact if you google what the length of a short story is, you’ll find each source cites wildly different word counts.

“41 pages isn’t bad,” you might say.  Well…I’m 41 pages in and haven’t even gotten close to what I originally planned as the final climactic event of the episode.  I’d say there’s at least 20 more pages to go.

This is quite unexpected, to be honest.  I ended up spending more time developing characters than expected, they have definitely taken on a life of their own.  Or at least, Amaya and Zerek have.  Arkad’s initial slow development is right on schedule with my original plan.  For now…

No way I’m paring that down.  If the format were a TV series, I’d likely be forced to.  Same with if these were going into a magazine.  But they aren’t.  And while there can be value in a more concise story, the whole point of The Orc War Campaigns is to delve deeper into the details of the universe of The Sword of Dragons, and to focus more on these three new characters.

It isn’t the first time I’ve broken whatever the ‘short story’ convention might be.  The final episode of Star Trek Dragon ended up being 83 pages in Microsoft Word, or 34,000 words.  Episode 4 of The Orc War Campaigns currently sits at 13,000 words.

episode66
http://www.stdragon.com/Season-7/episode-66/66.htm

I am VERY excited with where the characters are taking me.  Sometimes in unexpected directions, but always keeping it interesting.  And this episode is going to end up being a big one, not just in length, but in the events and the characters :D

Thanks for reading!
-Jon Wasik

Taking It Personally – When Does Fiction Become Public Domain?

Hi everyone!

In about 24 hours, the movie millions have been waiting for, Star Wars: The Force Awakens will be released!  In and of itself, the release of a new Star Wars in theaters is exhilarating, and given that it is the continuation of the story from the Original Trilogy, nerds everywhere (myself included) are ecstatic!

More so because George Lucas has no involvement in its creation!  ….wait, that seriously excites everyone?  The very man who invented Star Wars.  Who created the characters that has inspired generations, and invented the concept of the Force.

obi-wan_kenobi-confused

But let’s face it, over the past 20 years, in the eyes of countless fans, Lucas has slowly dismantled Star Wars and turned it into something that old-school fans despise.  I’m not one of them, mind you – I don’t love the prequels, but I don’t hate them either.  And I actually like most (but not all) of the changes he made to the Special Editions of the Original Trilogy.

Never-the-less, the fire Lucas has received has been incredibly harsh, so much so that he has been quoted recently as avoiding the internet altogether in order to avoid reading the criticism against him.

Which brings me to the point of this article…

A New Era – Fans Taking It Personally

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote an article about how Star Trek and Star Wars seem to build upon each other’s successes.  But they seem to be linked in another way as well – the fans react quite vehemently when something is entered into the fictional canon that they don’t like.

The Jar Jar of Star Trek? (Note: I actually like Neelix :) )
The Jar Jar of Star Trek? (Note: I actually like Neelix :) )

I still can recall discussions in fan forums back during the DS9 and especially during the Voyager and Enterprise era of Trek where fans were flat out blaming Brannon Braga for ‘destroying Trek and everything it stood for.’  They were taking it personally, and with each new series, the open hatred towards the producers grew worse.

The same thing has happened with Lucas…but it hasn’t stopped there.  No, not by a long shot.  In fact, if anything, this trend of being offended by aspects of their fandom that they don’t like has only grown worse.

Remember when Daniel Craig was announced as the new James Bond for Casino Royale?  Fan and media reactions were both very harsh.  Many people criticized him as being not handsome enough, not tall enough, and any number of other criticisms.  In fact there’s still a website online, http://www.danielcraigisnotbond.com dedicated to making sure everyone knows that Craig is not a suitable Bond.

roger-mooreIn reading up on this history recently, I learned that former Bond star, Roger Moore, had a few words to say about this.  While I cannot seem to find that article again, and so cannot directly quote Moore, I recall that he was surprised by the negative reaction to Craig.  He commented how 30 years ago, no one would have reacted to such a different direction for Bond, or any other franchise for that matter.

And then there’s Mass Effect 3.  The ending of this phenomenal trilogy of video games, with such an incredibly in-depth story and amazing characters, was considered to be one of the greatest let downs in the history of video games.

In fact, it was so bad that a law suit was filed against EA via the FTC, claiming that EA was guilty of false advertising.  Reactions were so bad that EA actually released a free DLC for Mass Effect 3 that revamped the ending, adding more choices, and created a somewhat better final experience for the game.

mass-effect-3-ending

Does Fiction Belong to the Fans?

From the looks of things (and based on fan reactions to The Hobbit movie trilogy) this trend is only growing.  So as a writer, this raises a very serious question: does fiction belong to the fans?  At what point does our creative work no longer belong to us?  Should I cater to the desires (or even demands) of fans for where I take my stories?

To my fellow writers out there, I’m willing to bet most of you are going to immediately say “No!!!  Never change your artistic direction to sate fans!  Nor should you do so for commercial reasons!”  I’ve heard this stance over and over throughout my entire life, especially in college, the domain of “Literary” fiction.

But you know what?  Fans matter.  Here, let me repeat that.

Fans Matters.

This has been my stance from day one of this blog, and goes back much, much further than that.  It has always been my greatest desire to connect to readers, to engage with them, to hear their thoughts and desires and opinions about my works.

Is this me selling out?  I don’t think so.  No matter what, my stories will always be the product of my creative vision.  But I also have an active and adaptive imagination.

I’ve also put this into practice.  My old fan fiction, Star Trek Dragon, is the perfect example.  I had this amazing idea to do a crossover between Star Trek and Star Wars.  The setting was perfect, because the USS Dragon was already lost in a galaxy ‘far, far away.’  And my idea was to make it a permanent crossover.

episode-28

It was not well received.  In fact, it is safe to say that the episode titles “A Long Time Ago” is the most disliked episode of STDragon.  So at the end of Season 3, I dropped that crossover…mostly.  And took STDragon in a very different direction from what I had originally planned.

 

And it turned out better.  So much better.

mitchell-sg1This is not to say writers should cater to every whim of the fans.  Do NOT try to please everyone, because that is impossible, and you’ll only drive yourself crazy.  And do not abandon your original creative endeavor.  The original story is still your creation.

All I am saying is don’t ignore them.  And what ever you do, do not ever think of your readers as simple-minded, as stupid, or as crazy.  The majority of readers are intelligent, sensitive individuals who enjoy quality entertainment (yes, I borrowed that quote from the 200th episode of Stargate SG-1.)

I’ve Digressed – Who Owns Fiction?

This is a question I asked my friend Wayne today.  Who owns fiction?  At what point does a fictional body become the domain of the public?

After discussing it with him and thinking further on it, I’ve come to the opinion that it is both, the moment it is released ‘into the wild.’  It is still the creator’s work, and they still will be the ones to guide it into the future.  But it also belongs to the public.  You’ve inspired them.  You’ve engaged their imagination, made them think.

And do not underestimate the impact you’ve had on readers.  If they react strongly to something you’ve written, it means you have succeeded in making them fall in love with your work.  That’s something amazing, and not to be ignored.

Not to mention, collaboration between creators and fans can result in an amazing product.  Look into Star Citizen for a perfect example :)

What do you all think?  This is a pretty heavy and hot topic, and I have no doubt that opinions will vary widely on it.  Please comment below!!  (But please keep it civil!)

Thanks for reading,
-Jon Wasik

Rediscovering My Creative Roots – Novels, Games, Movies

Hi everyone!

I know, 10 days since my last blog article, such a slacker :/  No worries, I won’t make any excuses…not like Han Solo here.

Image Source - vox-cdn.com
Image Source – vox-cdn.com

(Yeah, I’m just a little excited about the upcoming new Star Wars movie :D )

Which brings me to the actual point of this article – rediscovering my roots.  Novels, movies, video games.  Okay, so when I say discovering my roots, I mean my creative roots, my sources of inspiration.

I know I’ve mentioned them all in the past, but what I’ve not talked about is how I’ve lost touch with many of them lately.  I’ve spent so much time doing other things over the past year that I’ve read maybe 5 books in the past 12 months (an insanely low number for me), and played even fewer video games.

And these have always been fantastic sources of creative inspiration for me in the past.  Not the only ones, mind you, but I feel like I’ve strayed very far away from an important part of who I am: stories.

That’s why I watch movies, and read novels, and play video games.  Yes, even video games.  I hardly play them for the challenge, it’s the story I love :D

Must One Be Inspired In Order to Inspire?

Before anyone thinks otherwise, I’m not saying these are the only things that inspire me or make me happy, not by a long shot.  But I have felt like I’d lost a lot of my inspiration, and am only now rediscovering and rekindling that inspiration.

I mean, come on, I produced an entire novel in 3 months once (but it still needs some revision.)  Now…well when was the last time I wrote and finished a novel?  Last year.

Last.  Year.

Image source - google.com
Image source – google.com

That’s horrendous for me.  I used to write 9 novella-length stories a year when I was producing my fan fiction series.  Now it’s been over a year since I actually wrote a novel.

Is it because of my lack of inspiration lately?  I do know that I’ve begun to slowly immerse myself back into creative works, such as novels, movies, and even a little bit of gaming again.  And what has happened as a result?  I’ve finished all prewriting work on book 3 of The Sword of Dragons, and I’ve begun production of a series of short stories (okay, let’s face it, they’ll end up as novellas most likely, lol.)

But still no writing.  Until today.  Today, I’ve done just a little bit of actual writing, for the first time in what feels like forever.  And it was exhilarating!!!!  :D

The Power of Geekdom

So it’s no secret, I love these three creative sources.  But it goes soooo far beyond that.  It’s the people, the attitudes, the spirit, the culture.

Image Source - RMFW.org
Image Source – RMFW.org

That’s something I also started to discover before my slump.  When I started this blog, I went to the Colorado Gold Conference (writers are geeks in their own right :D ) and the Denver Comic Con.  It was so fantastic to meet up with and chat with people who understood and loved the same things I did.

20140614_133841
Denver Comic Con 2014

So, as I continue to rediscover all of my sources of inspiration, I think I’ll start immersing myself in the culture yet again.  I have some pretty awesome friends who can help with that, one of whom comes to mind is the same man who interviewed me for his podcast on VtW Productions, Wayne.  He’s hosting a gaming weekend at his house in a few weeks, and I’m really looking forward to meeting and hanging out with a bunch of fellow gamer geeks :D

Anywho, I’d write more, but…frankly, I want to get back to writing the story I started earlier :)  So until next time, I’ll see you all later!

Game on, read on, watch on, and never ever lose sight of what makes you who you are.

-Jon